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Grades 6–8
Informational, Media
Videos

The Egg Dozen Dilemma: What’s the Central Idea?

by Kaiden Griggs, Grade 6

KAIDEN GRIGGS has nimble fingers, which he uses to cautiously craft works of writing. He also uses his fingers to play the piano, an instrument he is quite seasoned in. He hopes that his works of art can open people’s eyes to the truth about the fragile food market we participate in.

Congratulations to 826 Digital Writers’ Showcase Finalist, Kaiden Griggs! Watch his video and see the lesson below to practice identifying the central idea and supporting details in an informational text. Read more about Kaiden and the other finalists at www.826national.org/826-digital-writers-showcase-2023-finalists.

Common Core Standards
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

What’s the Central Idea?

In this lesson, students will determine the central idea of a Mentor Text, The Egg Dozen Dilemma, and analyze how it is conveyed through particular details. Then, you will write an objective summary of the Mentor Text that is free of judgment and personal opinion. 

STEP 1

First, watch the video and follow along with the Mentor Text on the What’s the Central Idea? — Handout, pages 1-3. When you’re done, answer this question in your writing journal: “What is the central idea of the Mentor Text? Use your own words to describe it in 1-2 sentences.”     

STEP 2

Next, reread the Mentor Text and underline 4-6 key details that support the central idea you identified above. These are the facts and quotations that you think are the most important. Write your answers on page 4 of the handout.

STEP 3

Use your own words to write a full summary of the information presented in the Mentor Text. Your summary should include the key details you identified, and it should be objective and free from judgment or personal opinion. Below are two example sentences that show the difference between an objective sentence and a subjective sentence, which utilizes personal opinion. These sentences could be included in a summary about Pi(e) Day, which is a day of celebration acknowledged in the U.S. : 

  • Objective: Pi(e) Day occurs on March 14 (3/14) because the first 3 digits of the math concept, “pi,” are 3.14.
  • Subjective: Pi(e) Day is the best holiday because you get to eat pie, and pie is my favorite dessert. 

Before you write your summary, answer this question in your writing journal: “What are the differences in the sentences above?” After you answer that question, write your summary of the Mentor Text on page 5. If you need more space to complete your objective summary, continue in your writing journal.

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